One Piece Clear Evaporator Drain

The stock evaporator drain is very prone to clogging with debris. The location makes it also very difficult to clear the clog. It starts in the passenger side of the car, between the evaporator box, and the underbody. It’s a small gap, around 1 inch:
Drain 30 Drain 20

There’s a reducing 90 degree elbow, connected to a short hose that drains into the passenger side front wheel well, right onto the frame:

I previously vacuumed out my cabin air intake, and put a screen over it to keep debris out: http://www.16908.info/?p=1562

However, my AC drain clogged. I didn’t find this out until a good amount of water built up in my passenger side carpet.

The recommended way to clear the clog is to run some weed-wacker cutting line into the hose, and poke around to free the obstruction. Some people have had luck using a vacuum connected to the drain hose.

I found the hose was loose, and easily pulled off. I’m not sure it was even connected, and getting it reconnected was going to be very difficult with the AC dryer in the way:
Drain 10

The stock elbow can be cut with a thin saw blade, or gently heated and pried off. The saw method could possibly damage the box or nearby wiring. I opted to use the heat gun, and screwdriver to pry it off. Once I got it off, more water drained onto the cabin floor, and some out onto the ground:
Drain 45

Here’s the reducing elbow, all clogged up:
Drain 35Drain 40

I’ve seen mods where spark plug boots, or coil cover boots are used to make an easily detachable piece to drain water. I decided against any kind elbow, or connection in favor of one single piece of tubing.

I had a length of Chemical-Resistant Clear Tygon tubing left over from building a brake fluid pressure bleeder:
Drain 50

I then boiled some water with a kettle, and held it over the steam for a few seconds. Then I shoved a scissors into the tubing, and opened the scissors to stretch the tubing. After a few tries, I was able to finally get the tubing around a 13mm socket:
Drain 55

I also used the steam to work the tubing into curve. The stock elbow is a hard 90 degrees, so this gentle curve should reduce clogging. Here’s the old drain, and the new one:
Drain 60

The tubing has a 1/16″ wall thickness, and is very rigid. The inner diameter is 5/16″ and appears larger than the stock elbow:
Drain 90

Now I worked the tubing into the hole in the underbody, and got it out into the wheel well:
Drain 65

After some twisting, I got it into position, and onto the evaporator drain:
Drain 61

Blowing air through the tube was easy, which confirmed there were no kinks. Now I angled it down, below, and away from the frame. A zip tie secured it:
Drain 70

Whenever I vacuum my interior, I’ll also attach it to the drain hose to suck out any debris which may have found its way into the hose. Hopefully this will keep the drain clog free, and my carpet dry.

To summarize, here’s the benefits of this mod:

  • Clear tubing allows a clog to be seen
  • longer tubing allows water to drain away from the frame, reducing frame rust
  • Eliminates 90 degree elbow, reducing clogs
  • Larger internal diameter tubing reduces possibility of clogs
  • One piece can’t become disconnected in the wheel well
  • Easier to vacuum or snake out debris
  • No need to cut or modify the underbody

Tools:

  • Heat Gun
  • Long flat blade screw driver
  • Scissors
  • 13mm socket
  • Tea Kettle

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Chemical-Resistant Clear Tygon Tubing 5/16″ ID, 7/16″ OD, 1/16″ Wall Thickness, 5 ft. Length McMaster-Carr

1

$ 11.75

On Hand

DCS 2016

I attended the 2016 Delorean Convention and Show. The location was around 175 miles away in Springfield, IL, which made driving very manageable. I also did some volunteer work for the convention.

Driving to and from Springfield, I discovered a few problems with my car:

  • I definitely have a “hot-start” problem with the K-Jet. Restarting the car after driving over two hours in the heat was very difficult. I plan to replace the accumulator since it’s original to the car.
  • My evaporator box drain is clogged, and soaked my passenger side carpet. More on that later.
  • The fuel pump boot cover popped off, and was letting fumes into the cabin.
  • The fuel pump still hums loudly after a long drive, with hot gas in the tank. Someone measured an increase in gas temperature from the gas return line. The hot air dam probably helps keep hot air away from the fuel tank, but doesn’t keep the gas tank cooler when returning gas is hotter than when it left.

Anyway, my car still made the trip safely. Here’s some pictures:
DCS2016 10DCS2016 15

My car, lit up:
DCS2016 55

My car, in the lower left, lit up:
DCS2016 140 DCS2016 135

Chris N working his magic on stainless:
DCS2016 76 DCS2016 75 DCS2016 70

An amazing Digital Dash, in “Corvette Mode”
DCS2016 80

An amazing Digital Dash in “Delorean Mode”
DCS2016 85 DCS2016 90 DCS2016 95

Me with the limo and D-Rex:
DCS2016 100DCS2016 99  DCS2016 105 DCS2016 110 DCS2016 115 DCS2016 120 DCS2016 122 DCS2016 125

Time Machines:
DCS2016 170 DCS2016 171 DCS2016 172

Glossy:
DCS2016 65

DPI Stainless Frame with lots of fingerprints:
DCS2016 62 DCS2016 61 DCS2016 60

Packing up. My car with the D-Rex:
DCS2016 200

The DMC Midwest Connection:
DCS2016 175 DCS2016 180 DCS2016 185

White LED Door Lights

I previously had installed Red and Amber LEDS. One of my door light lenses was cracked, which needed to be replaced. I’ve seen some custom door light colors, and decided to switch them all to white to match my undercarriage LED lighting, and my interior LED lighting.

My current door LED Lights:
DoorLight (5) DoorLight (3) DoorLight (2) DoorLight (1)
New Cool White LED bulbs. I like the shallow depth, and how they won’t be up against the lens:
DoorLight (6)

I had some scrap plastic that was thick enough for the lenses:
DoorLight (8)

Cutting a lens out:
DoorLight (9)DoorLight (10)

I painted the inside of the lights white, so the lights won’t look black or gray inside, and to reflect more light.
DoorLight (7)DoorLight (18)

I then sanded the lens to give it a translucent finish. My prototype looks good:
DoorLight (11)DoorLight (16)DoorLight (14)DoorLight (12)

Cutting more lenses:
DoorLight (19)

Almost done:
DoorLight (20)

Done:
DoorLight (21)

I found some of the stock incandescent bulbs, and they were drawing .24 amps. The LED door lights I was using were drawing .03 amps. My new Cool White LEDS draw .01 amps. I’m happy with my amperage savings.

Supplies/Tools:
Plastic for Lenses
Masking Tape
Marker
Rotary Tool with cutting disk and sander
LEDs
200 Grit Sandpaper
White paint
Small paint brush

Costs:

Item Vendor Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

(8) COOL WHITE 4SMD LED WEDGE LIGHT BULBS T10 eBay

1

$ 8.99

$ 8.99

$ –

$ –

$ 8.99

Undercarriage Lighting

I’ve seen several Deloreans with underside lighting, and liked the look. The LED strips that are available make this pretty easy.

UnderLight0

Supplies:

LED Strip (Water Resistant)
LED solderless connectors.
Wiring shrink wrap
Automotive, or similar stranded wires
Soldering Iron
Aluminum tape
Clear Mailing Tape
Zip ties
Cleaning Supplies
Rags

I previously added a fused circuit to my car from the positive connection, to one of my On/Off switches on the center console. The other On/Off switch was added for the power outlets on my car:

http://www.16908.info/?p=2573

Then I ran a wire from the On/Off switch, through the console, down through the storage compartment. I drilled a very small hole near the handbrake cables, and brought the wire down under the car.
The underbody needs to be cleaned thoroughly where you want to mount the LED strip. Once mounted, I put clear mailing tape over the strip to help support it. The aluminum tape meant for ductwork is very tacky, and creates a strong bond molding and taking shape. I use it cover the ends of the strip connections.

I have three separate sections of LED Strip mounted: one around the inside of the front fascia, and two on the sides of the car. The side strips ground to the fuel tank plate. The front strip power runs along the frame, and is grounded to the passenger side horn bracket. The solderless connectors that I purchased turned out to be the wrong type, however I was able to make them work by cutting and modifying them.

Colored strips, or color-changing strips are available. I chose a simple white color. I think they look great at night.

UnderLight2UnderLight1

Costs:


Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

10PCS 10mm 2Pin Free Solder Connector Cable for LED Strip eBay

1

$ 3.99 $ 3.99 $ – $ – $ 3.99
12 Volt White 5M 3528 SMD 600 Waterproof LED Flexible Strip Light eBay

1

$ 8.99 $ 8.99 $ – $ – $ 8.99
All other supplies used On Hand           $ –
            Total $ 12.98

Glass Polish

The car has had water spots on the glass ever since I purchased it.

Polish 10

At some point in its life, it spent time in the state of Georgia, and apparently acid rain is a big problem there. The water spots are so bad in some areas, that you can catch your fingernail on them. In addition to the water spots, my glass seemed to have a haze on it. I’ve tried several options so far:

  • Newsprint
  • Vinegar
  • “Invisible Glass” cleaner
  • RainX Foaming glass cleaner
  • 0000 Steel Wool

All have had little to no effect on removing these water spots. Now I’ve finally purchased a felt polishing wheel, and some cerium oxide.

The felt polishing wheel is very dense and strong. I opted to use an electric corded drill, since any battery powered drill would probably be drained after several minutes of polishing. I cleaned the windows, and mixed some cerium oxide with distilled water in a plastic container. I taped off the window trim, and brushed on some water and cerium oxide mixture. I soaked the felt polishing wheel in my mixture, and started polishing.
Polish 21 Polish 20

I made sure to apply even pressure, and keep moving the pad around the glass. The goal was to polish all the area of the glass evenly for the same amount of time. I was thrilled to see the water spots being removed!
I later taped off the DMC SEKURIT labels on the glass, and used a rotary tool with a small felt pad to polish the small areas around the labels. I’m not going to attempt polishing inside the labels, so unfortunately it will never look 100% polished.
Polish 40 Polish 41

The left side window seal was looking ratty, so I replaced it:
Polish 30 Polish31

I’m happy to finally have the spots and haze gone, and my glass now has a great shine to it!

Polish 50

The cerium oxide packet that comes with the kit is 8 ounces, and I probably only used two ounces total.

Tools:

Plastic food container to mix the polish
Electric Drill (corded preferred)
Cerium Oxide
Felt polishing wheel
Tape
Rotary tool
Polishing bits for rotary tool
water (distilled preferred)
foam brush
vinegar
microfiber cloth

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

Gordon Glass Cerium Oxide – 8 Oz with 3″ Felt Polishing Wheel Amazon.com

1

$ 29.95

$ 29.95

$ 5.15

$ –

$ 35.10

Left Window Wipe Seal DMC Midwest

1

$ 36.11

$ 36.11

$ 13.72

$ 2.80

$ 52.63

     

 

 

 

Total

$ 87.73

Seat Repair

My driver’s seat was needing repair. I previously had the bottoms repaired

http://www.16908.info/?p=1221

and had built new seatbacks:

http://www.16908.info/?p=2330

At some point in the car’s life, the cabin was exposed to elements, and most of the metal on the seat rusted.

Seat 10 Seat 12Seat 25

The thin wires on the seatback rusted through, and the burlap had deteriorated. The seat back kept popping off, and the foam was pushing through because the foam didn’t have any support. All this was leaving crud all over my interior carpet:

Seat 15Seat 16

Finally, the neck area of the seat cover wasn’t secured properly.

I decided to tackle these jobs myself this time, with a complete disassemble and refurbish.

Seat covers came off. I found the seat cover ribs weren’t even in their slots, rather clipped onto the seat cover with hog rings. Even worse, it looks like some of the car’s original, deteriorated seat covers were still attached:

Seat 20 Seat 21 Seat 22

The foam came out. I washed the foam, and after several rinses, the wash water finally came clean. This will help remove any “old” smell that the seat was holding.

Seat 30 Seat 31 Seat 40 Seat 45

I painted the seat frames with rustoleum gloss black paint. (Sorry, no pictures)

I rebuilt the seatback with coat hanger wires (hah!) and new burlap. Very strong.

Seat 50 Seat 80

I felt the driver seat bottom needed more support, and the leather was still bunching up after the seat’s previous rebuilt. I decided to add some seat foam. The picture shows two pieces, but I only used one.

Seat 51 Seat 52 Seat 53 Seat 54

I put the seat cover back on with new hog rings, and was able to properly secure the “neck” area with many zip ties. Zip ties also were used to attach the ribs to the frame.

Seat 55 Seat 56 Seat 81 Seat 61Seat 60

New screws replaced the rusted ones on the trim. A broken screw was stuck in the frame, which I forgot to remove before I recovered the seat. Luckily I was able to get it out without taking the cover off again. I even sanded stone scuff marks off the reclining lever. I then coated it with some spare SEM Landau Black Color Coat I had leftover from my previous interior work.

Seat 76 Seat 77

It still isn’t perfect, but it looks, feels, and works a lot better.

seat 100 seat 1001 Seat 101

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Tax

Total

14″ Zip Ties 10 Pack Home Depot

1

$ 1.99

$ 1.99

$ 0.15

$ 2.14

8″ Zip Ties 100 Pack Harbor Freight

1

$ 3.99

$ 3.99

$ 0.33

$ 4.32

Washers Ace Hardware

6

$ 0.39

$ 2.34

$ –

$ 2.34

1 Yard Burlap JoAnn Fabrics

1

$ 1.99

$ 1.99

$ 0.16

$ 2.15

2″ X 15″ X 17″ High Density Foam JoAnn Fabrics

1

$ 7.99

$ 7.99

$ 0.67

$ 8.66

Hog Ring Pliers with 200 Hog Rings eBay

1

$ 15.98

$ 15.98

$ –

$ 15.98

Trim Screws Ace Hardware

4

$ 0.31

$ 1.24

$ 0.10

$ 1.34

         

Total

$ 36.94

Footwell Lighting

I’ve seen footwell lighting in several cars, and decided it was something I wanted. I bought some LED strip lights, and made a wiring harness. I used purple wire to match the car’s lighting wire color, and black for the grounds.

Footwell (1)

My harness gets power from the glove box light. I also made the harness fit in between the stock wiring, and the glove box light switch, so I didn’t have to cut the car’s harness. My harness can be removed without any issues. The LED strip lights draw less than 1 amp, and the reduced amperage from my interior LED lights insure that I’m in no danger of blowing a fuse, or melting wire.

Footwell (3)Footwell (2)

I needed a new drivers light switch since one was missing. It came with a 3-pronged piece that makes it easy to connect the car’s door lights, and the female connection on my driver’s side footwell lights.

Footwell (5)Footwell (8)

The LED strips are simply glued with contact adhesive to the backs of the kneepads. There are two sections of strip lights on the harness, one for each footwell, and they are grounded separately at each door light switch. They work independently, depending on which door is open.
I was able to install the lighting while I had the interior torn apart a few years ago:

Footwell (7) Footwell (4)

I think they look great at night.

Footwell (10) Footwell (9) Footwell (11)

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Tax

Total

5Meter 300LEDs 3528 SMD Pure White LED Strip eBay

1

$ 5.57

$ 5.57

$ –

$ 5.57

Door Switch (too many parts to list) DMC Midwest

1

$ 15.14

$ 15.14

$ 1.17

$ 15.14

Purple Primary Wire on Hand  

 

 

 

 

Black Primary Wire On Hand  

 

 

 

 

Female wiring connector On Hand  

 

 

 

 

Contact Adhesive On Hand  

 

 

 

 

Total

$ 20.71