One Piece Clear Evaporator Drain

The stock evaporator drain is very prone to clogging with debris. The location makes it also very difficult to clear the clog. It starts in the passenger side of the car, between the evaporator box, and the underbody. It’s a small gap, around 1 inch:
Drain 30 Drain 20

There’s a reducing 90 degree elbow, connected to a short hose that drains into the passenger side front wheel well, right onto the frame:

I previously vacuumed out my cabin air intake, and put a screen over it to keep debris out: http://www.16908.info/?p=1562

However, my AC drain clogged. I didn’t find this out until a good amount of water built up in my passenger side carpet.

The recommended way to clear the clog is to run some weed-wacker cutting line into the hose, and poke around to free the obstruction. Some people have had luck using a vacuum connected to the drain hose.

I found the hose was loose, and easily pulled off. I’m not sure it was even connected, and getting it reconnected was going to be very difficult with the AC dryer in the way:
Drain 10

The stock elbow can be cut with a thin saw blade, or gently heated and pried off. The saw method could possibly damage the box or nearby wiring. I opted to use the heat gun, and screwdriver to pry it off. Once I got it off, more water drained onto the cabin floor, and some out onto the ground:
Drain 45

Here’s the reducing elbow, all clogged up:
Drain 35Drain 40

I’ve seen mods where spark plug boots, or coil cover boots are used to make an easily detachable piece to drain water. I decided against any kind elbow, or connection in favor of one single piece of tubing.

I had a length of Chemical-Resistant Clear Tygon tubing left over from building a brake fluid pressure bleeder:
Drain 50

I then boiled some water with a kettle, and held it over the steam for a few seconds. Then I shoved a scissors into the tubing, and opened the scissors to stretch the tubing. After a few tries, I was able to finally get the tubing around a 13mm socket:
Drain 55

I also used the steam to work the tubing into curve. The stock elbow is a hard 90 degrees, so this gentle curve should reduce clogging. Here’s the old drain, and the new one:
Drain 60

The tubing has a 1/16″ wall thickness, and is very rigid. The inner diameter is 5/16″ and appears larger than the stock elbow:
Drain 90

Now I worked the tubing into the hole in the underbody, and got it out into the wheel well:
Drain 65

After some twisting, I got it into position, and onto the evaporator drain:
Drain 61

Blowing air through the tube was easy, which confirmed there were no kinks. Now I angled it down, below, and away from the frame. A zip tie secured it:
Drain 70

Whenever I vacuum my interior, I’ll also attach it to the drain hose to suck out any debris which may have found its way into the hose. Hopefully this will keep the drain clog free, and my carpet dry.

To summarize, here’s the benefits of this mod:

  • Clear tubing allows a clog to be seen
  • longer tubing allows water to drain away from the frame, reducing frame rust
  • Eliminates 90 degree elbow, reducing clogs
  • Larger internal diameter tubing reduces possibility of clogs
  • One piece can’t become disconnected in the wheel well
  • Easier to vacuum or snake out debris
  • No need to cut or modify the underbody

Tools:

  • Heat Gun
  • Long flat blade screw driver
  • Scissors
  • 13mm socket
  • Tea Kettle

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Chemical-Resistant Clear Tygon Tubing 5/16″ ID, 7/16″ OD, 1/16″ Wall Thickness, 5 ft. Length McMaster-Carr

1

$ 11.75

On Hand

White LED Door Lights

I previously had installed Red and Amber LEDS. One of my door light lenses was cracked, which needed to be replaced. I’ve seen some custom door light colors, and decided to switch them all to white to match my undercarriage LED lighting, and my interior LED lighting.

My current door LED Lights:
DoorLight (5) DoorLight (3) DoorLight (2) DoorLight (1)
New Cool White LED bulbs. I like the shallow depth, and how they won’t be up against the lens:
DoorLight (6)

I had some scrap plastic that was thick enough for the lenses:
DoorLight (8)

Cutting a lens out:
DoorLight (9)DoorLight (10)

I painted the inside of the lights white, so the lights won’t look black or gray inside, and to reflect more light.
DoorLight (7)DoorLight (18)

I then sanded the lens to give it a translucent finish. My prototype looks good:
DoorLight (11)DoorLight (16)DoorLight (14)DoorLight (12)

Cutting more lenses:
DoorLight (19)

Almost done:
DoorLight (20)

Done:
DoorLight (21)

I found some of the stock incandescent bulbs, and they were drawing .24 amps. The LED door lights I was using were drawing .03 amps. My new Cool White LEDS draw .01 amps. I’m happy with my amperage savings.

Supplies/Tools:
Plastic for Lenses
Masking Tape
Marker
Rotary Tool with cutting disk and sander
LEDs
200 Grit Sandpaper
White paint
Small paint brush

Costs:

Item Vendor Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

(8) COOL WHITE 4SMD LED WEDGE LIGHT BULBS T10 eBay

1

$ 8.99

$ 8.99

$ –

$ –

$ 8.99

Footwell Lighting

I’ve seen footwell lighting in several cars, and decided it was something I wanted. I bought some LED strip lights, and made a wiring harness. I used purple wire to match the car’s lighting wire color, and black for the grounds.

Footwell (1)

My harness gets power from the glove box light. I also made the harness fit in between the stock wiring, and the glove box light switch, so I didn’t have to cut the car’s harness. My harness can be removed without any issues. The LED strip lights draw less than 1 amp, and the reduced amperage from my interior LED lights insure that I’m in no danger of blowing a fuse, or melting wire.

Footwell (3)Footwell (2)

I needed a new drivers light switch since one was missing. It came with a 3-pronged piece that makes it easy to connect the car’s door lights, and the female connection on my driver’s side footwell lights.

Footwell (5)Footwell (8)

The LED strips are simply glued with contact adhesive to the backs of the kneepads. There are two sections of strip lights on the harness, one for each footwell, and they are grounded separately at each door light switch. They work independently, depending on which door is open.
I was able to install the lighting while I had the interior torn apart a few years ago:

Footwell (7) Footwell (4)

I think they look great at night.

Footwell (10) Footwell (9) Footwell (11)

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Tax

Total

5Meter 300LEDs 3528 SMD Pure White LED Strip eBay

1

$ 5.57

$ 5.57

$ –

$ 5.57

Door Switch (too many parts to list) DMC Midwest

1

$ 15.14

$ 15.14

$ 1.17

$ 15.14

Purple Primary Wire on Hand  

 

 

 

 

Black Primary Wire On Hand  

 

 

 

 

Female wiring connector On Hand  

 

 

 

 

Contact Adhesive On Hand  

 

 

 

 

Total

$ 20.71

Latch Maintenance, Modification

I previously had adjusted my latches, performed the “wedgectomy,” and lubricated them generously with white lithium grease:

http://www.16908.info/?p=2422

Once again, the latches jammed. Removing the top door panel, and removing the latch rods with your bare hands while trapped in the car isn’t fun. I then found this post on DMCTalk:

http://dmctalk.org/showthread.php?12682-door-latch-adjustment-problem&p=182992&viewfull=1#post182992

…which basically means my lithium grease and any other previously used lubricants could have gummed up the latches. So once again, I decided to remove all the latches. I cleaned and degreased them with brake cleaner, my air compressor with a blow gun, and dozens of paper towels. Before re-installing them, I chose to change the “lock linkages” in each door to “lock linkage.” I eliminated the lock linkage on the front of each door. Having two latches means they must be in sync for both opening and unlocking. One lock obviously means there is nothing to sync, which is much easier to setup and maintain. Some people have successfully disconnected their front locks, so the door only locks on the rear latches. The only danger is you might drive over a bump, and the lock might engage. Once engaged, and with no way to unlock the front latch, this will really make getting out of the car a challenge. So I came up with this modification:

LockUnlock

This is the latch, and the arm, that moves back and forth between lock and unlock. Simply drill a small hole in the latch, and wrap some wire around the arm and the latch to secure it. The wire won’t interfere with the latch.
DSC_0029
The reverse side of the latch. You can see the wire doesn’t interfere
DSC_0033

Presto! The latch should never lock, but can easily be converted back to a locking latch.

You can now remove the lock rod that goes to the forward latch. I had to cut and retained half of my lock rod since it is needed for my aftermarket door lock actuators:
DSC_0028 (2)  DSC_0028 (4)

This time around, I lubricated the latches with WD-40. Once reinstalled, I then performed the Door Lock and Latch Adjustment process. After that, comes testing everything! Test the exterior door handles, interior door handles, exterior locks, interior locks, and in my case, remote locks and remote door launchers. Be sure to test it with the door’s plastic membrane in place to see if it interferes with anything.

In my case, everything is working correctly. Time to reinstall the door panels again. Hopefully they’ll stay installed for many years to come.

New Braided Stainless Fuel Hoses

I wanted to update the engine’s fuel hoses to the more modern, safer braided stainless hoses.

Tools Used:
Inch Pounds Torque Wrench – I used this one: http://www.amazon.com/TEKTON-24320-4-Inch-Torque-20-200-Inch/dp/B00C5ZL2EG/
Open-end metric wrenches
Metric socket set
Vice
Utility Light
Grease
Berryman B12 Chemtool or other solvent cleaner
Nitrile gloves
shop rags/paper towels

Here’s the steps I came up with:

  1. Work in a well ventilated area. If I’m working in my garage, I keep the door open, with a fan pushing air out the door.
  2. Take the fire extinguisher out of your Delorean (you should have one), and keep it nearby.
  3. Disconnect the battery.
  4. Remove the air cleaner.
  5. Remove any plug wires that are easily accessible, and label their cylinder number with tape. Take pictures or make notes on how they are routed.
  6. Lift up on the clips that hold the injectors in place. Be careful not to bend them. There are three prongs on each clip.
  7. Label all hoses you remove, and take pictures, or make notes on how they are routed.
  8. Remove the hoses:
    1. One at a time, remove the banjo bolts on the fuel distributer, warm up regulator, and cold start valve.
    2. Use paper towels or rags to soak up any gas. Dispose of the rags properly.
    3. Attempt to dump out any gas in the lines into a clean glass container. You can choose to re-use the gas if you like.
    4. Once the hose is off, screw the banjo bolt back in a few threads so it doesn’t get lost.
    5. Throw out the old copper washers, or put them in a container clearly marked “Used Washers.” We’ll find a use for them later.
    6. Clamp a 10 mm wrench in a vice, put the injector in the wrench, and use a socket to take the banjo bolt out of the injector.
    7. Set aside the injector banjo bolts.
    8. You will need to remove the “pipe of agony” to get to the #4 injector. I was determined to leave the pipe in place, and skip the agony, but after unsuccessfully trying to manipulate the injector out, I gave in. Here’s what I did:
      1. Disconnect the elbow from the idle speed motor.
      2. Slide out the pipe with the rubber elbow still attached
        FuelHose (7)
  9. Clean the injectors if desired (see below)
  10. Replace the old hoses and washers with the new hoses, and new washers. Don’t re-use the old washers!
  11. Leave the banjo bolts loose in case a hose needs to be re-routed. You can torque the banjo bolts later.
  12. Lay your plug wires in place.
  13. Check to make sure the pipe of agony will fit with your hoses and plug wires.
    1. My #4 Cylinder plug wire and fuel hose are routed under the pipe
    2. My #5 and #6 Cylinder plug wires are over the pipe
    3. My #6 Cylinder hose runs over the pipe, while my #5 Cylinder hose runs under the pipe
  14. Make sure the engine cover will close with the hoses coming off the fuel distributer, running to the warm up regulator.
  15. Now torque the banjo bolts. For this, I used my new inch-pound torque wrench:
    FuelHose (3)
    1. M8 Banjo bolts: 7-9 foot lbs., or 84-108 inch lbs.
    2. M10, Banjo bolts: 9-11 foot lbs., or 108-132 inch lbs.
    3. I first started with the bare minimum torque setting, then re-torqued them to a value approximately in the middle of the range.
  16. Reinstall the “Pipe of Agony” or in my case, the “Pipe of Ease.” Finding the spot to reinstall the pipe is tricky. For me, it slid right in with ease on the first try. Here’s how I did it:
    1. Grease up the end of the pipe. I used a pea size amount of synthetic brake grease, which will hold up to the engine’s heat very well.
    2. Bend over the engine compartment, with the top of your head near the firewall, and your left eye near the warm up regulator. You should be able to barely spot where the pipe goes into the air meter housing. There’s a brass ring, or keeper that the pipe slides into.
    3. Some people put a small flashlight in the air meter housing, which aides finding the spot to insert the pipe because light shines out the air meter housing hole. I didn’t need it.
    4. Shove it in. The rubber hose lined up with the idle speed motor, and I could see the end of the pipe in the air meter housing:
      FuelHose (8)
  17. Reinstall the air cleaner.
  18. Reconnect the battery.
  19. Attempt to start the car. You will need to let the pump prime for a bit, and give it some gas during startup.
  20. While the car is running, check for leaks.
  21. Put the fire extinguisher back in the car.

Pictures
Before:
FuelHose (1)
FuelHose (2)FuelHose (9)
After:
FuelHose (10)

Cleaning the injectors
I wouldn’t recommend my injector cleaning process to anyone, since there are much more professional setups available. Still, I wanted to clean the injectors as best I could. The Delorean’s CIS injectors don’t have any plastic parts, and can be safely cleaned with solvents. I got a can of Berryman’s B12 Chemtool, and soaked the injectors in a jar for a few days, occasionally swishing them around, and trying to dump out any crud. I brought the pressure in my air compressor down to 80 psi, butted them up to a blow gun, and verified the injectors open and close with air pressure. In the future, I might build a hose attachment that’s screws into the injector and attaches to a compressor, so solvent can be blown through the injector for cleaning and testing. For this I might utilize some old, re-used copper washers.
FuelHose (5)FuelHose (4)FuelHose (6)

I ripped apart an injector seal, and broke an injector clip when trying to bend it back into shape. I thought about trying to source them from a Volvo dealer, but ended getting them shipped from DMC Midwest.

I only dropped one copper washer… however it fell near some spent copper washers, and I couldn’t tell the new one from the old ones. I opted to just replace it with some spares I had.

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

Fuel Injection Lines Braided SS (9 pcs), Black DMC Midwest

1

$ 229.83

$ 229.83

$ –

$ 17.81

$ 247.64

Injector Clip DMC Midwest

1

$ 4.99

$ 4.99

$ –

$ 0.39

$ 5.38

Injector Seal DMC Midwest

1

$ 3.13

$ 3.13

$ –

$ 0.24

$ 3.37

Inch Pound Torque Wrench Amazon.com

1

$ 36.72

$ 36.72

$ –

$ –

$ 36.72

$ 293.11

Auto Shifter Plate

I purchased this new in 2012, and only just now installed it. Not only is it aesthetically pleasing, it helps keep everything in place. My plastic shifter plate was warped after many years in the sun, and this metal plate reinforces the plastic, keeping it flat.

Before:

IMAG0583

After:

DSC_0271

I think it works well with the new steering wheel:

DSC_0269

 Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

Auto Trans Plate DMOCO.com

1

$ 59.95 $ 59.95 $ 7.50 $ – $ 67.45
Trim Screws with finish washers Ace Hardware

2

$ 0.57 $ 1.23 $ – $ 0.09 $ 1.23

Total:

$ 68.68

Stereo Upgrade

I’ve always thought my stereo sounded way to thin, and needed an upgrade. There was practically no bass in the system at all. The previous owner installed a pretty basic head unit and speakers:

20131228_182454  DSC_0242
DSC_0240 DSC_0241 (2)

While my side panels were off, I decided to replace the speakers:
DSC_0221DSC_0222

These speakers got good reviews with the other Delorean owners, and fit the rear location, albeit with better hose clamps and some persuasion:
DSC_0224DSC_0223

I also took the time to upgrade the front dash speakers. I’m glad I did since the speakers the previous owner installed were very low quality. I found some Pioneer speakers that fit the location perfectly:
DSC_0230

After some searching, I decided to upgrade the head unit as well. The new one features Bluetooth hands-free calling and audio streaming, wired external microphone, voice recognition, Pandora, USB direct control for iPod/iPhone, Android Media access, a remote control, and more.
20140425_185241 

DSC_0212 

It’s been said the stock wiring might not handle a modern stereo’s electrical needs. I took the time to run a new 12 Gauge yellow wire from the positive post behind the rear wall. A fuse holder is spliced into the wiring. Sorry, I didn’t get any pictures of that.

My upgraded negative battery cable features a smaller wire that was currently being unused. I found a new use for it: dedicated ground for my stereo.
20140425_145755

Upgrading the wiring meant I got to remove all the glass fuses behind the dash:

DSC_0241

While my A pillar trim is removed, I ran the cable for the microphone up the A pillar:
 DSC_0242 (2)

The result: The new features of the head unit are great!
DSC_0247
I still think the sound quality isn’t great. It needs more bass. I’m going to have to investigate a subwoofer.

Costs:

Item Vendor

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

Infinity 529I 165W (Peak) 5-1/4 -Inch Two-Way Speakers (Pair) Amazon.com

1

$73.49

$73.49

$0.00

$0.00

$73.49

Pioneer TS-A878 3 1/2 Inch 2-Way Speakers Amazon.com

1

$33.27

$33.27

$0.00

$0.00

$33.27

Pioneer Bluetooth USB SIRI Mixtrax MVHX360BT Amazon.com

1

$85.00

$85.00

$0.00

$0.00

$85.00

Hose Clamps Ace Hardware

2

?

?

$0.00

?

$5.37

Black Primary Wire O’Reily Auto Parts

1

$6.99

$6.99

$0.00

$0.58

$7.57

Yellow Primary Wire Advance Auto Parts

1

$6.99

$6.99

$0.00

$0.58

$7.57

Fuse Holder Advance Auto Parts

1

$3.29

$3.29

$0.00

$0.27

$3.56

heat shrink tubing (assorted box) Advance Auto Parts

1

$10.99

$10.99

$0.00

$0.91

$11.90

Butt connections Advance Auto Parts

1

$2.99

$2.99

$0.00

$0.25

$3.24

Ring Terminals Advance Auto Parts

1

$3.49

$3.49

$0.00

$0.29

$3.78

Assorted disconnect terminals On Hand

 

 

 

 

 

 

Split Cable Wrap On Hand

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

$234.74

 

 

New Power Outlets

My cigarette lighter was broken, and the power outlet’s green plastic was cracked. I found an excellent replacement on ebay for $5.29 shipped: http://www.ebay.com/itm/360678268535
attachment DSC_0209

I knew that even if it didn’t fit, for that price I would make it fit. But yes, it fits perfectly. It’s a little more modern looking, and it’s blue! I measured the lighter drawing under 7.5 amps, and the lamp under 0.8 amps. I don’t know what the stock lighter draws since mine is broke. The only drawbacks I found were the light requires a separate ground, and it’s a little dim. I didn’t check, but I think the bulb is incandescent. I cut my wiring harness and added another female disconnect connector for the lamp’s ground.
DSC_0215
The power outlet I bought through ebay comes in other colors, even green.

I also wanted to add some power outlets behind the dash for electronics:
10242
Fuse 17 is rated at 20 amps. My cell phone and dash cam combined draw less that 1 amp, and my ’83 also doesn’t have a clock on Fuse 17. Adding two more outlets wasn’t a problem. Since Fuse 17 is live all the time, I decided on another mod:


After some fast shipping with DMC-MW, I cut the wiring harness and put a switch in the middle of the circuit. So now all my power outlets are controlled by the switch. This allows me to stop and start my dash cam whenever I want without touching the cam or the power connector.

My A Pillar trim is off the car right now, so I’ll be running the power for the dash cam behind the trim, then above the headliner.

Costs:

Item  

Quantity

Unit Cost

Cost

Shipping

Tax

Total

Blue Auto Power Outlet/Lighter ebay

1

5.29

5.29

5.29

Double Power Outlet O’Reily Auto Parts

1

6.69

6.69

0.45

7.14

Purple Primary Wire 14 Gauge 1 Foot O’Reily Auto Parts

4

0.31

1.24

0.08

1.32

On/Off Switch, Console (Pair) DMC Midwest

1

69.95

69.95

12.99

5.42

88.36

Electrical Disconnects On Hand

 

 

 

 

 

Heat Shrink Tubing On Hand

Total

$ 102.11

New Custom Mirror Switch

I liked the look of the new Mirror Switch available from DMC-Houston, however the price was a little high for an unneeded upgrade. I know it’s made from a mirror switch used in a Saturn, so decided to try and make my own. I went to a salvage yard, and found one. Next I made a plastic plate to hold the switch:
DSC_0331     DSC_0350

I found the wiring connector online at britishwiring.com. I also found wiring diagrams online to help me figure out all the connections.
DSC_0530

I didn’t like how the DMC-Houston switch looked upside-down:
DSC_0527
I could see the polarity of the mirror motors was opposite of what the switch was. Up was down, Right was left, and so on. The options I had were:

  1. Do what DMC-Houston did: flip the switch upside–down, and swap the right and left mirror wires
  2. Reverse the wiring in my cars wiring harness.

I choose option 2. I pried the wire connections out of the mirror connectors, and reversed them. If the cars next owner ever tries to install an original switch, they’re going to hate what I did!
DSC_0528
Original mirror switches have been going for a good price on ebay, so I decided to sell mine.
DSC_0510 auction

Since I bought my car in 2007, my passenger mirror hasn’t had up and down functionality. I was happy to find out during testing that it was a dirty/bad connection.

I actually finished the switch in mid-2013, however I wasn’t able to finally install it until now due to my door panels being removed. Here it is, finally installed:
DSC_0220DSC_0219

From the pictures, it looks like the interior is still kind of dusty. Time for a complete detailing.

Costs:
(It’s not too often I make money!)

Item Vendor Cost
Mirror Switch Sale Ebay

$ 105.00

Ebay fees Ebay

$ (14.50)

Paypal fee Paypal

$ (3.50)

Shipping FedEx

$ (12.96)

9-Way 3mm Pin & Socket Connector BritishWiring.com

$ (16.50)

Saturn Mirror Switch Salvage Yard

$ (6.00)

Black Plastic On Hand

$ –

SEM Black Landau Color Coat On Hand

$ –

Profit

$ 51.54

Front, Rear and Trunk LEDs!

By now, the basics of LEDs are well known: longer life, faster light up time, and reduced power consumption. Many Delorean owners are converting their incandescent bulbs to LEDs for all of these benefits. One really well written blog entry on Delorean LED conversion and benefits can be found here:

http://delorean2109.blogspot.com/2011/07/going-100-leds-on-your-car-is-good-idea.html

I saw someone else used these 48 LED SMD Panels as a trunk light. I liked the look, and had a few panels left over. This is a big improvement in brightness over the incandescent festoon bulb, and my later LED festoon bulb:
DSC_0626DSC_0622

I should have probably bought bigger brake lights, but after testing, these 42 LED bulbs were deemed just as bright as the incandescent brake lights. I purchased amber colored LEDs for the turn signals, however I was disappointed that the turn signals were dim. I decided to replace them with some bigger white LEDs.
DSC_047720131227_144234

I added a 48 LED SMD Panel to the engine bay light as well:
DSC_0621

I reclaimed the LED festoon bulbs from the trunk, engine bay, and interior lights. I used two of them in the rear license plate lights. I like the white color they produce, compared to the dim, yellow-ish light.
DSC_0139DSC_0140

The flasher relay I purchased wasn’t set up correctly for what the Delorean needed. Swapping some relay pins with some jumper wires was a quick and easy fix. New flasher (left), old flasher (right):
DSC_0517

Using the same 12 volt battery for my testing, I measured the amperage of the lights I removed, and the new LED lights. Here’s the breakdown:

Light Application Quantity Used Incandescent Amps LED Amps Amperage Savings
Back Turn

2

2

0.26

3.58

Back Running

2

0.57

0.25

0.64

Back Brake

4

2

0.16

7.36

Back Reverse

2

2

0.31

3.38

Front Running/Turn 1st Contact

2

0.46

0.1

0.72

Front Running/Turn 2nd Contact

2

1.71

0.29

2.84

License plate

2

0.42

0.03

0.78

Trunk Light

1

0.73

0.21

0.52

Engine Bay Light

1

0.73

0.21

0.52

Rear Dome

1

0.42

0.42

0

Front Dome

1

0.42

0.1

0.32

Total:

20.56

Now all these lights aren’t lit at the same time, so the savings isn’t always over 20 amps. However, I have significantly reduced the load on the electrical system. Maybe my alternator will live a little longer.

Costs:

Item Location Qty Vendor

Cost

Shipping

Total

Flasher Relay Under Dash, drivers side

1

Ebay

$ 2.79

$ 1.70

$ 4.49

1156 BA15S 68 SMD Amber / Yellow Tail Fog Turn Signal 68 LED Car Light Bulb Lamp Rear Turn Signal

2

Ebay

$ 6.92

$ –

$ 6.92

1157 BAY15D 102 SMD Pure White Brake Tail Turn Signal 102 LED Light Lamp Bulb S Front Indicator, turn signal

2

Ebay

$ 8.92

$ –

$ 8.92

1156 BA15S 102 SMD Pure White Tail Signal Turn 102 LED Car Light Lamp Bulb 12V Reverse

2

Ebay

$ 9.92

$ –

$ 9.92

1156 BA15S P21W 3528 SMD 44 LED Bulbs Light Lamp CANBUS Anti Sans S0BZ Rear Running

2

Ebay

$ 9.92

$ 1.55

$ 11.47

1156 Tail Brake White 42 SMD LED Light Bulb Lamp Brake Lights

4

Ebay

$ 2.00

$ 7.38

$ 9.38

48 SMD LED White Panel Light Trunk Light

1

Ebay

$ 3.03

$ 0.40

$ 3.43

48 SMD LED White Panel Light Engine Compartment

1

Ebay

$ 3.03

$ 0.40

$ 3.43

LED Festoon bulb License Plate Lights

2

On Hand

$ –

Total:

$ 57.96

 

Unused:
Item Location Quantity Vendor

Cost

Shipping

Total

1156 BA15S 68 SMD Amber / Yellow Tail Fog Turn Signal 68 LED Car Light Bulb Lamp Rear Turn Signal

2

Ebay

$ 6.92

$ –

$ 6.92